Tag Archives: memory

March Madness Fans Have Selective Memories

via Axon Sports

Depending on who you talk to, there are different definitions of something called, “The Shot” in the history of the NCAA men’s basketball tournament.  To North Carolina fans, its Michael Jordan’s game winning jumper in the 1982 final, while to Hoosier fans, its Keith Smart’s 16-foot swish with under 10 seconds to go in 1988. But Christian Laettner’s last second turnaround game winner in the 1991 regional final over Kentucky is forever etched into the memories of Duke fans. Do those same rabid supporters remember the crucial missed shots from their heroes over the years?  Neuroscience researchers at Duke University wanted to find out so they tested the memories of some …

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Sport-specific memory and information chunking

via Axon Sports

One of the most interesting distinctions to think about when we’re talking about athletes and cognition is the difference between the reactive, lighting-quick decision making that happens on the field, and the slower, more deliberate though involved in what often gets called “strategy”. Both are important, but both are different.  In some ways the divide mirrors the difference between implicit or procedural memory–skills that we execute without thinking consciously about them, like riding a bike–and explicit or declarative memory, which are memories that we call forth, like remembering the capitol of California. Th high-speed recognition of anticipatory cues, discussed a few weeks ago, is a skill that falls more into the …

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NFL players on playbooks, information chunking and the quiet brain

via Axon Sports

Here’s a great article at AOL News from a couple months back that has actual NFL players talking about the difficulties of learning an NFL playbook, the strategies that they use and the way that their minds have to translate the language of different systems. In several places there are echoes of topics that we’ve talked about on the blog lately. It’s always nice to hear the intuitions of players confirm the findings of science. Here’s Trent Dilfer on the process by which a play goes from something that he “knows” on a conscious, cognitive level, to something that he “owns”, which is much deeper. It’s also pretty clear from the …

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