Tag Archives: News

Athletes and Perceptual Learning

via Axon Sports

One of the most e-mailed New York Times articles this week is on Perceptual Learning, and how it is being applied in schools. The idea behind perceptual learning is that, rather than focusing first on the rules and explicit logic behind a problem or skill, students should start by working with problems in a hands-on, concrete way, in order to develop a naturalistic, intuitive understanding of the task at hand. The concepts raise a whole host of exciting questions about how athletes might learn differently, too. Via NYTimes: Most American middle school students, though they understand what fractions represent, don’t do so well when tested on their ability to change one …

read more

Tags: , ,

Nike Strobe Specs may or may not improve visual-perceptual performance

via Axon Sports

Limiting the amount of visual and perceptual information that an athlete receives is quickly becoming a new frontier in performance training.  A couple weeks ago we looked at the special anticipatory skills of elite athletes and the way that they are able to use only the most relevant visual information to predict future events.  Now, a new study* out of Duke University’s Visual Cognition lab reports the results of an experiment in which the effects on visual-perceptual function of Nike’s new Vapor Strobe goggles** were tested on a population of Duke club and varsity athletes across a variety of sports. The strobe eyeware essentially creates an experience in which the wearer’s …

read more

Tags: , ,

Scoop Jackson at ESPN thinks studying the athletic brain is worthless

via Axon Sports

Yesterday we posted a link to Carl Zimmer’s article in Discover Magazine on the athletic brain and sporting intelligence. Worth posting for the sake of contrast is Scoop Jackson’s response to that article on ESPN’s Page 2. Any new idea will meet with resistance, especially when that new idea a) is based on science that may be unfamiliar and b) threatens to change an institution/culture that can be stubbornly averse to change (i.e. sports). Jackon’s objections to the idea of identifying, studying and assessing athletic intelligence run along the lines of: 1. The brains of athletes are not worth studying. See, the problem is not in the solutions found, but in …

read more

Tags: , ,

Discover Magazine article on the athletic brain

via Axon Sports

The latest issue of Discover Magazine has a lengthy article from Carl Zimmer that references a lot of the research that we have and will discuss on this site.  It’s one of the first mainstream magazine articles to talk about the athletic brain and sport-specific intelligence in a scientific way, and is evidence that this whole idea is beginning to pick up some steam.  The article concludes by discussing recent research suggesting that there may be ways to help the brain learn new skills faster, via brain stimulation from an external source, and the ethical implications of such training aids. In February 2009 Krakauer and Pablo Celnik of Johns Hopkins offered …

read more

Tags: ,